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Events

Oliver Bullough is a prize-winning journalist and author from Wales, who specialises in the former Soviet Union and corruption. His work appears in the Guardian, the New York Times, GQ magazine, Prospect and elsewhere, and he regularly appears on the BBC, Sky News, CNN and other media outlets. His latest book is Moneyland, about which John le Carré said: "If you want to know why international crooks and their eminently respectable financial advisors walk tall and only the little people pay taxes, this is the ideal book for you".Read More
Acclaimed investigative journalist and author of The Last Man in Russia, Oliver Bullough takes us on a journey into the universe of the lawless, stateless super-rich. This is a land where third-world kleptocrats rub shoulders with terror financiers, captains of industry, and western heads of state; from the ruins of Kiev to the Bond-villain lairs of Knightsbridge and Central Park, something has gone wrong with the economic structures of the world. Learn how the institutions of the United States and Europe have become money-laundering operations, climbing over one another in a scramble to sell off the foundations of their own stability. Discover the true cost of being open for business, no matter the customer. Meet the dictators (and their awful children). More encouragingly, find out how activists around the world are fighting to put the genie of unlimited power with zero responsibility back into the bottle. Oliver Bullough pieces together some of the biggest news stories of the past years - from the Panama Papers, to Ukrainian conflict, Trump, and runaway inequality - into a single coherent diagnosis. Take a walk on the dark side of globalisation, and discover the all-pervasive organised crime networks that reach from Russia to the banks of the world, and to every personal computer connected to the web.Read More
Acclaimed investigative journalist and author of The Last Man in Russia, Oliver Bullough takes us on a journey into the universe of the lawless, stateless super-rich in his new book Moneyland. This is a land where third-world kleptocrats rub shoulders with terror financiers, captains of industry, and western heads of state; from the ruins of Kiev to the Bond-villain lairs of Knightsbridge and Central Park, something has gone wrong with the economic structures of the world. Learn how the institutions of the United States and Europe have become money-laundering operations, climbing over one another in a scramble to sell off the foundations of their own stability. Discover the true cost of being open for business, no matter the customer. Meet the dictators (and their awful children). More encouragingly, find out how activists around the world are fighting to put the genie of unlimited power with zero responsibility back into the bottle. Oliver Bullough pieces together some of the biggest news stories of the past years - from the Panama Papers, to Ukrainian conflict, Trump, and runaway inequality - into a single coherent diagnosis. Take a walk on the dark side of globalisation, and discover the all-pervasive organised crime networks that reach from Russia to the banks of the world, and to every personal computer connected to the web. **As always we have 15 free places available for this event, first come first served, just get in touch by giving the bookshop a call or popping in and we will add your name to the guest list! **Read More
Investigative journalist Oliver Bullough takes us on a trip to Moneyland, a realm of the lawless, stateless super rich. He argues that lax attitudes to money-laundering are undermining the West's stability, explains the true cost of a Britain that is "open for business" whoever the customers, and introduces us to the kleptocrats and their awful children.Read More
Names like Passchendaele, Verdun and The Somme are etched into our national consciousness but the last months of the First World War are often overlooked. Peter Hart, official oral historian at the Imperial War Museum, has pieced together one of history's greatest endgames in The Last Battle. The result, marking the centenary, is a "superb account of the tactics that finally brought victory on the Western Front," according to The Times. By August 1918, the outcome of the Great War was not in doubt but would the Germans prolong the conflict, with the loss of hundreds of thousands more young lives? Hart, author of Gallipoli and The Great War, draws on the accounts of generals as well as ordinary soldiers as he brings to life the dramatic final weeks. He also reminds us that the collective armies of France, Britain, America and Belgium achieved total domination over the German Army on the Western Front. "The all too frequent deaths so close to The Armistice gives a terrible poignancy to this last battle," Hart writes. "This book... is a tragic story told for the most part by those men who were lucky enough to survive. Many did not."Read More
Do you say 'bath' (as in 'hearth') or 'bath' (as in 'maths')? Controversy or controversy? Halifax or 'Alifax? Pronunciation unites people and divides them, gives people joy and infuriates them. Little wonder that the subtitle of David Crystal's Sounds Appealing is The Passionate Story of English Pronunciation. The book tells us why and how we pronounce words the way we do. Taking in phonetics, linguistics and physiology, Crystal explores the origins of regional accents, how they are influenced by class and education and how they have changed over time. To say that Crystal is an expert on the English language is something of an understatement: he has written more than 100 books on the subject, ranging from Listen to Your Child to Think on My Words: Exploring Shakespeare's Language. He has an OBE for services to the English language; he is Honorary Professor of Linguistics at the University of Wales, Bangor; and he is the author of the definitive Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language. Now, repeat after me: the rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain.Read More
In The Last Battle, Peter Hart, author of Gallipoli and The Great War, and oral historian at the Imperial War Museum, brings to life the dramatic final weeks of the war, as men fought to secure victory, with survival seemingly only days, or hours away. Drawing on the experience of both generals and ordinary soldiers, and dwelling with equal weight on strategy, tactics and individual experience, this is a powerful and detailed account of history's greatest endgame.Read More
In Democracy Hacked, Martin Moore examines how our own fragile political systems are being gamed by authoritarian states, shadowy hackers and unaccountable social media firms. Is our democracy more vulnerable than we realise? Martin Moore will be in conversation with David Runciman, Professor of Politics at Cambridge and author of How Democracy Ends.Read More
This is the story of wealth and power in the twenty-first century. It isn't too late to change it. . Join the investigative journalist Oliver Bullough in Moneyland - the secret country of the lawless, stateless, super rich - and learn how the institutions of Europe and the USA have become money-laundering operations, undermining the foundations of Western stability. Discover the true cost of being open for business no matter how corrupt and dangerous the customer and find out how heroic activists around the world are fighting back. Oliver Bullough will then be joined by Brian Cathcart, formerly a senior journalist at the Independent papers and the New Statesman and author of several books, including The Case of Stephen Lawrence, The Fly in the Cathedral and most recently The News from Waterloo.?Read More
Mary Shelley was brought up by her father in a house filled with radical thinkers, poets, philosophers and writers of the day. Aged sixteen, she eloped with Percy Bysshe Shelley, embarking on a relationship that was lived on the move across Britain and Europe, as she coped with debt, infidelity and the deaths of three children, before early widowhood changed her life forever. Most astonishingly, it was while she was still a teenager that Mary composed her canonical novel Frankenstein, creating two of our most enduring archetypes today. The life story is well-known. But who was the woman who lived it? She's left plenty of evidence, and in this fascinating dialogue with the past, Fiona Sampson sifts through letters, diaries and records to find the real woman behind the story. She uncovers a complex, generous character - friend, intellectual, lover and mother - trying to fulfil her own passionate commitment to writing at a time when to be a woman writer was an extraordinary and costly anomaly.Read More
Mary Shelley was brought up by her father in a house filled with radical thinkers, poets, philosophers and writers of the day. Aged sixteen, she eloped with Percy Bysshe Shelley, embarking on a relationship that was lived on the move across Britain and Europe, as she coped with debt, infidelity and the deaths of three children, before early widowhood changed her life forever. Most astonishingly, it was while she was still a teenager that Mary composed her canonical novel Frankenstein, creating two of our most enduring archetypes today. The life story is well-known. But who was the woman who lived it? She's left plenty of evidence, and in this fascinating dialogue with the past, Fiona Sampson sifts through letters, diaries and records to find the real woman behind the story. She uncovers a complex, generous character - friend, intellectual, lover and mother - trying to fulfil her own passionate commitment to writing at a time when to be a woman writer was an extraordinary and costly anomaly.Read More

Borderline Book Festival

Date: 6 Oct 2018

To be alive is to be in perpetual change: growing, healing, learning, ageing. In Shapeshifters, award-winning writer and doctor Gavin Francis considers the transformations in mind and body that continue across the arc of human life. Some of these changes we have little choice about. We can't avoid puberty, the menopause, or our hair turning grey. Others may be welcome milestones along our path - a much-wanted pregnancy, a cancer cured, or a long-awaited transition to another gender. We may find ourselves turning down dark paths, towards the cruel distortions of anorexia, or the shifting sands of memory loss. New technologies can upgrade us, and even without them our bodies can transform in rare, almost magical, ways - with gigantism, or the sun-sensitivity and facial hair that led porphyria sufferers, once upon a time, to be suspected as werewolves. Medicine now has unprecedented power to alter our lives, but that power has limitations. As he helps patients face transformations both temporary and sustained, Francis draws on history, art, literature, myth and magic to show how the very essence of being human is change. Gavin Francis is a GP , and the author of True North and Empire Antarctica: Ice, Silence & Emperor Penguins, which won the Scottish Book of the Year Award and was shortlisted for the Ondaatje Prize and Costa Prize. He also writes for Guardian, The Times, London Review of Books and Granta. He lives in Edinburgh with his wife and children.Read More
From the classical world to the modern day, from Medusa and Athena to Theresa May and Hillary Clinton, Mary Beard dissects the cultural underpinnings of misogyny and discusses how we can change the narrative around women and power.Read More
Mary Shelley's life story is well known. But who was the woman who lived it? In this fascinating dialogue with the past, Fiona Sampson sifts through letters, diaries and records to find the real woman behind the story. She uncovers a complex, generous character - friend, intellectual, lover and mother - trying to fulfil her own passionate commitment to writing at a time when to be a woman writer was an extraordinary and costly anomaly.Read More
From the ruins of Kiev to the Bondvillain lairs of Knightsbridge and Central Park, the world's financial system has gone awry. Join Orwell Prize shortlisted journalist Oliver Bullough as he investigates the lawless, stateless super rich who rub shoulders with terror financiers, captains of industry and western heads of state. This is the story of wealth and power in the 21st century - but heroic activists around the world are fighting back.Read More
London is awash with dirty money, generated by vast criminal networks operating darkly in every corner of the world. From the ruined towns of Kiev to Bond-villain lairs in Knightsbridge and Manhattan, join investigative journalist Oliver Bullough on a journey into Moneyland, the secret country of the lawless, stateless superrich, where kleptocrats rub shoulders with terror financiers, captains of industry and heads of state. The story of wealth and power in the 21st century, he explains why the world is run by thieves, and, importantly, how to take it back. Chaired by Lucy Manning.Read More
By August 1918, the outcome of the Great War was not in doubt: the Allies would win. But what was unclear was how this defeat would play out - would the Germans hold on, prolonging the fighting deep into 1919, with the loss of hundreds of thousands more young lives, or could the war be won in 1918? In The Last Battle, Peter Hart, author of Gallipoli and The Great War, and oral historian at the Imperial War Museum, brings to life the dramatic final weeks of the war, as men fought to secure victory, with survival seemingly only days, or hours away.Read More
Mary Shelley's life story is well known. But who was the woman who lived it? In this fascinating dialogue with the past, Fiona Sampson sifts through letters, diaries and records to find the real woman behind the story. She uncovers a complex, generous character trying to fulfil her own passionate commitment to writing at a time when to be a woman writer was an extraordinary and costly anomaly.Read More
Mary Shelley was brought up by her father in a house filled with radical thinkers, poets, philosophers and writers of the day. Aged sixteen, she eloped with Percy Bysshe Shelley, embarking on a relationship that was lived on the move across Britain and Europe, as she coped with debt, infidelity and the deaths of three children, before early widowhood changed her life forever. Most astonishingly, it was while she was still a teenager that Mary composed her canonical novel Frankenstein, creating two of our most enduring archetypes today. The life story is well-known. But who was the woman who lived it? She's left plenty of evidence, and in this fascinating dialogue with the past, Fiona Sampson sifts through letters, diaries and records to find the real woman behind the story. She uncovers a complex, generous character - friend, intellectual, lover and mother - trying to fulfil her own passionate commitment to writing at a time when to be a woman writer was an extraordinary and costly anomaly.Read More
Does the rise of "strong man" politics across the globe and the fracturing of liberal consensus into competing identity groups herald the decline (perhaps terminal) of democracy? Or do recent challenges to the status quo (the Brexit vote, the Trump presidency) simply represent a vigorous, much-deserved rebuff for out-of-touch, self-serving elite? The leading political scientist Francis Fukuyama (Identity), writer and commentator Sarah Churchwell (Behold America), The Times columnist and broadcaster Melanie Phillips (Guardian Angel: My Journey from Leftism to Sanity) and historian Michael Burleigh (The Best of Times, the Worst of Times) join Philip Collins of The Times to consider the path ahead.Read More

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