How Puzzles Improve Your Brain (Ebook)

The Surprising Science of the Playful Brain

Richard Restak, Scott Kim

Whether you want to improve your memory, or give your brain a full work-out to improve logic and visual observation skills, this book is packed with brain training puzzles and games to boost your mental skills.

Regular mental exercises, including crosswords, Sudoku, and even brain training computer games, can help to improve memory, fine motor skills, perception and cognition. Solving different types of mental exercises helps the brain to reshape and strengthen itself, as well as heightening imagination and creativity skills.
Anyone who wants to improve their memory, logic or perception skills can turn to the individual exercises (by Scott Kim who creates puzzles for magazines including Scientific America) featured in How Puzzles Improve Your Brain, that will stimulate the area of the brain that controls those skills.
Richard Restak outlines how the brain processes individual functions, while Scott Kim has created puzzles that stimulate and challenge the area of the brain responsible for that function, giving your brain an engaging work-out. Drawing on decades of scientific research, this book can change your brain as you read it.

If you want to enhance your brain performance regular mental exercises, including crosswords and Sudoku (even brain training computer games), can help to improve memory, fine motor skills, logic and visual observation. Solving different types of mental exercises helps the brain to improve itself, as well as heightening imagination and creativity skills. Packed with illuminating insights and dozens of witty and, often, perplexing puzzles

How Puzzles Improve Your Brain can create a healthier brain while explaining how the puzzles are changing it. In How Puzzles Improve Your Brain Scott Kim, a puzzle master, has designed puzzles that can target, and improve, specific areas of the brain while Richard Restak, a leading neuroscientist, describes the science behind how they reshape and strengthen the brain.

Packed with illuminating insights and dozens of witty and often perplexing exercises, this mind-boggling book is designed to enhance specific brain functions and can aid anyone who wants to improve their memory, logic, or perception skills.

Publication date: 15/12/2012

£3.99

ISBN: 9780285641761

ISBN 10 / ASIN: B00APDW320

Imprint: Souvenir Press

Subject: Science & Mathematics

Reviews for How Puzzles Improve Your Brain

'These mind-training exercises will make you brighter than you've ever been.'

 Mail on Sunday

'One of the world's leading neurologists... A fascinating study of how to 'stop the rot' and have a lot of fun doing it.'

 Avanti

'We all, I hope, exercise our brains in doing various games like crosswords and Sudoku daily, so knowing how they can influence your other memory skills and thinking processes should make you pay more attention to your grey matter... Read and learn.'

 SF Crowsnest Blog

'This is a book about how our brains work, how the different parts interact or come into play in certain circumstances.'

 The Bookbag

'Thoroughly well researched... Very entertaining... It made me think and play in ways I had not done before and actually explained what my brain was doing whilst attempting these puzzles.'

 Puzzlemad

'Packed with illuminating insights and dozens of witty and, often, perplexing puzzles How Puzzles Improve Your Brain can create a healthier brain while explaining how the puzzles are changing it.'

 Books Monthly

Richard Restak

Richard Restak

Richard Restak (born 1942) is an American neurologist, neuropsychiatrist, author and professor.

Scott Kim

Scott Kim

Scott Kim is an American puzzle and computer game designer, artist, and author of Korean descent. He started writing an occasional 'Boggler' column for Discover magazine in 1990, and became an exclusive columnist in 1999, and created hundreds of other puzzles for magazines such as Scientific American and Games, as well as thousands of puzzles for computer games. He was the holder of the Harold Keables chair at Iolani School in 2008.
Kim was born in 1955 in Washington D.C. and grew up in Rolling Hills Estates, California. He had an early interest in mathematics, education, and art, and attended Stanford University, receiving a BA in music, and a PhD in Computers and Graphic Design under Donald Knuth. In 1981, he created a book called Inversions, words that can be read in more than one way. His first puzzles appeared in Scientific American in Martin Gardner's "Mathematical Games" column and he said that the column inspired his own career as a puzzle designer.
Kim is one of the best-known masters of the art of ambigrams.
Kim is a regular speaker on puzzle design, such as at the International Game Developers Conference and Casual Games Conference.
He lives in Burlingame, California with his family.